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No one is safe: Jordanian people refuse to let fear dictate their lives

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Jordanians travel to southern Jordan Feb. 6 to pay respects to the family of Lt. Moaz al-Kasasbeh, the pilot burned alive by the Islamic State after his plane crashed in late December 2014. (Roy Gutman | Tribune News Service)

Jordanians travel to southern Jordan Feb. 6 to pay respects to the family of Lt. Moaz al-Kasasbeh, the pilot burned alive by the Islamic State after his plane crashed in late December 2014. (Roy Gutman | Tribune News Service)

Throughout the past month, developments of the Jordanian-ISIL hostage crisis have gone from tense to brutally violent. Tensions between Jordan and the international terrorist organization have escalated to such a high point that Jordan has committed a violent bombardment of ISIL’s occupied territory. Iranian figures report that Jordan’s increased military capabilities have “destroyed 20 percent of the fighting capabilities of (ISIL),” showing how one can expect the Jordanian government to respond to the extremism and non-negotiation of hostages.

This threat was the public execution and conflagration of Lt. Moaz al-Kasasbeh, a pilot in the Jordanian Royal Air Force.

Though this barbaric stunt is in line with the terrorist group’s previous actions, al-Kasasbeh is the first Muslim man who has been killed on display, raising questions about the group’s sectarian mission. This invariably counteracts with the group’s objective of creating a sweeping Muslim state and has significantly hurt the group’s image amongst other Islamic extremist groups.

Questions have been raised as to what the motivations were for the Islamic State to act in such a way, and if they are truly organized enough to present a legitimate and longstanding claim on its place in the international community. Not only has the act of burning al-Kasasbeh alive negatively impacted the recruitment of Jordanian peoples, but ISIL’s killing of British hostage David Haines on Sept. 13, 2014, caused a severe decline in the membership to the group from the U.K. and nearly all parts of               Western Europe.

(Roy Gutman | Tribune News Service)

(Roy Gutman | Tribune News Service)

Due to the mishandling of hostage negotiations, which led to the failure of cooperation in a deal and the killing itself, ISIL has seen a significant hit to its credibility, legitimacy and overall strength of leadership. According to ABC News, after being interrupted in a conference and given a briefing of the news of the video, President Obama said, “I think we’ll redouble the vigilance and determination on the part of our global coalition to make sure they’re degraded and ultimately defeated. It also just indicates the degree to which whatever ideology they’re operating off of … it’s bankrupt.”

ISIL’s actions have failed to cause fear in the hearts of the Jordanian people, and it has caused a new nationalistic backlash to emerge out of Jordan. The recent war powers resolution laid out to the hands of Capitol Hill made it clear that the United States was responding in the same fashion, echoing sentiment from the Japanese, British and French governments, all whom have lost citizens and soldiers to ISIL.

This recent attack reduces the criteria for who is an acceptable ISIL execution candidate, meaning that any citizen worldwide is eligible to be treated in an inhumane and barbaric fashion. These are international threats that must be addressed through the usage of military force, lest it go uncontained and continue to escalate the death toll of innocent lives.

3 Comments

3 Responses to “No one is safe: Jordanian people refuse to let fear dictate their lives”

  1. Arafat on February 23rd, 2015 9:27 am

    “Though this barbaric stunt is in line with the terrorist group’s previous actions, al-Kasasbeh is the first Muslim man who has been killed on display, raising questions about the group’s sectarian mission.”
    ++
    Actually there are dozens and dozens of videos showing ISIS and the dozens of other Islamist groups killing Muslims. I am not sure what you mean by this sentence, but it is not true as written.

    [Reply]

  2. Arafat on February 23rd, 2015 9:31 am

    “This invariably counteracts with the group’s objective of creating a sweeping Muslim state and has significantly hurt the group’s image amongst other Islamic extremist groups.”

    +++

    I again disagree. Taliban, al-Qaeda, Boko Haram and the dozens of other Islamist groups make it a common practice to kill other Muslims. In fact it is very rare that a day goes by when this does not happen. Example: On February 21st, forty-three Sunnis were burned to death by ISIS forces in al-Baghdadi, Iraq.

    [Reply]

  3. Arafat on February 23rd, 2015 9:33 am

    I’ve got a novel idea. Let’s do nothing. Let the Muslims deal with their own problems for a change. Let’s let countries like Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Kuwait with their endless ocean of money and Western-bought armaments figure it out instead. Surely they – being practitioners of the religion of compassion and peace – will step right up to the plate in our stead.
    OK, you caught me there. You knew I was kidding! You knew what I know which is that there is no answer to these Islamic cesspools. Whatever we do will be discredited and if we do nothing then Syria will become just another country in the endless line of Hell on Earth Islamic countries.
    We cannot save Muslims from themselves. It is like trying to save an alcoholic. Until they are ready to abandon their religion – a religion that emphasizes aggression and violence and sadism – anything we do will simply be a band-aid on a gaping wound.
    Let them go through their DTs on their own. Only then will they be ready for our friendship and help, and only then will we find a way forward together as friends.

    [Reply]

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No one is safe: Jordanian people refuse to let fear dictate their lives