UPDATED: Associated Press unable to declare a caucus winner

Supporters+of+Pete+Buttigieg+attend+the+Mt.+Vernon+South+precinct+caucus.
Back to Article
Back to Article

UPDATED: Associated Press unable to declare a caucus winner

Supporters of Pete Buttigieg attend the Mt. Vernon South precinct caucus.

Supporters of Pete Buttigieg attend the Mt. Vernon South precinct caucus.

Xavier Ortega

Supporters of Pete Buttigieg attend the Mt. Vernon South precinct caucus.

Xavier Ortega

Xavier Ortega

Supporters of Pete Buttigieg attend the Mt. Vernon South precinct caucus.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Feb. 6, 2020, 7:17 p.m.:  The Associated Press declared that they are not able to declare a winner for the Iowa caucus.

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez asked the Iowa Democratic party to recanvass. This will require a check of the vote count to ensure that results were added correctly.

At the time of publication, Buttigieg maintains his narrow lead over Sanders, holding three more state delegate votes of those counted.

“The Associated Press calls a race when there is a clear indication of a winner. Because of a tight margin between former Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Bernie Sanders and the irregularities in this year’s caucus process, it is not possible to determine a winner at this point,” said Sally Buzbee, AP’s senior vice president and executive editor.

The AP will continue to report on the caucus and will release results from any recounts or recanvasses.

Feb. 6, 2020, 12:00 p.m.: As of Thursday morning, 97 percent of precincts have reported.

Pete Buttigieg holds on to a very narrow lead of 26.2 percent, with Bernie Sanders in a close second of 26.1 percent.

Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden follow with 18.2 percent and 15.8 percent, respectively.

Buttigieg is currently leading in 59 counties, with Sanders leading in 19.

Results have not yet been released for precincts in 28 counties.

 

Feb. 5, 2020, 8:15 p.m.: Almost 48 hours after the end of the Iowa caucuses, 92 percent of precincts’ results have been reported.

Pete Buttigieg and Bernie Sanders have 26.5 percent and 25.6 percent of votes, respectively, narrowing the gap between the two candidates in the lead. Both still have 11 delegates.

The top four remain the same, with Elizabeth Warren receiving 18.3 percent and Joe Biden 15.9 percent of votes.

Candidates have moved their focus onto New Hampshire, which will hold its primary Feb. 11. Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Andrew Yang and Tom Steyer  will participate in a presidential town hall in New Hampshire with CNN Wednesday evening.

 

Feb. 5, 2020, 3:45 p.m.: Pete Buttigieg and Bernie Sanders remain the leading candidates in Iowa with 85 percent of precincts reporting.

Buttigieg now has 26.7 percent of votes and Sanders has 24.4 percent. Both have 11 delegates so far.

Elizabeth Warren now has 17.4 percent of votes and Joe Biden 15.9 percent. Warren has five delegates and Biden none.

 

Feb. 4, 2020, 11:10 p.m.: With 71 percent of precincts reporting, Pete Buttigieg maintains a slight lead over Bernie Sanders in the Iowa Democratic Party caucuses.

Buttigieg has 26.8 percent of votes to Sanders’ 25.2 percent.

Elizabeth Warren, Joe Biden and Amy Klobuchar have 18.4 percent, 15.4 percent and 12.6 percent, respectively. The remaining candidates have 1 percent or less of all votes.

The Associated Press said the race was still too close to call.

 

Feb. 4, 2020, 4:15 p.m.: After long delays, the first results from the Democratic Iowa caucus are in. 

The results of 62 percent of the precincts have been announced, with Pete Buttigieg in the lead with 26.9 percent, Bernie Sanders with 25.1 percent, Elizabeth Warren with 18.3 percent, and Joe Biden with 15.6 percent.

Just outside the top four are Amy Klobuchar with 12.6 percent, Andrew Yang with 1.1 percent and Tom Steyer with 0.3 percent.

State-wide precinct results were delayed due to a glitch in the new automatic reporting process, with the Iowa Democratic Party reporting “inconsistencies” in the reporting of results. 

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.