Advertisement
The Student News Site of DePaul University

The DePaulia

The Student News Site of DePaul University

The DePaulia

The Student News Site of DePaul University

The DePaulia

“Eric Larue” review: Shoddy artistry upends an otherwise novel story of tragedy and faith

%E2%80%9CEric+Larue%E2%80%9D+review%3A+Shoddy+artistry+upends+an+otherwise+novel+story+of+tragedy+and+faith

The directorial debut of notable actor Michael Shannon, “Eric Larue” tiptoes around the crisis of a school shooting, too afraid to step into a space of meaningful commentary. Following a couple trying to manage the aftermath of their son’s assault on three high schoolers, one partner seeks repentance through religion while the other self-isolates. The different coping methods fail to matter as nonsensical monologues of faith and its trailing rejection shroud both of their lives, leaving them alone with the vicious past that defines them. With leading performances by Judy Greer and Alexander Skarsgard, the duo explores an abrasive world filled with off-putting characters, offering honest performances within a story that continues to turn them down. At its best, when it addresses a horrible situation head-on, “Eric Larue” only shines when moments of meaningless conversation are brushed aside and performers are allowed to express themselves openly. Sadly, these moments are rarely shown, as the film leaves its audience and characters on a much hazier note than where they started.

*This film screened at the 59th Chicago International Film Festival 

More to Discover