Kimmy Schmidt recap: Breaking up and rollerskating is hard to do

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(Photo courtesy of UNBREAKABLE KIMMY SCHMIDT OFFICAL FACEBOOK PAGE)

(Photo courtesy of UNBREAKABLE KIMMY SCHMIDT OFFICAL FACEBOOK PAGE)

The second season of “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” begins with a story that pulls viewers back into the show by foreshadowing the introduction of new characters and new developments in the lives of Kimmy, Titus, Jaqueline and Lillian, all the while tying up loose ends left at the end of last season.

The first episode, “Kimmy Goes Roller Skating!” kicks off with Titus, whose estranged ex-wife Vonda shows up to sue him for leaving her at the altar. This reveal at the end of last season showed so much promise for an extended season two arc, but in the first episode it was executed like a one-off episode. Titus eventually realizes the damage he caused, and makes peace with her at a train station where her train has been delayed because the company “run(s) late on purpose so people can find each other in romantical fashion. Amtrak, it’s for lovers.”

While the Amtrak joke was great, I wish their relationship had more time to grow to the point they got to at the end. Not taking away from the choreographed dance sequence, but there was room for a much more real conclusion to their complex past while keeping Paula Abdul in the mix.

Meanwhile, Kimmy goes out with Lillian and reconnects with Dong at a roller rink after a string of bad dates. They discuss new developments in their lives as well as the Kardashians. Kimmy ends up crashing Dong’s brunch get together only to be shot down by Dong because he doesn’t want to disrespect his wife, regardless of the reasons he married her for.

As this episode seems to suggest, last season was not it for Kimmy and Dong. Their relationship works so well because they are both in awe with this strange new culture they are experiencing for the first time. This season will no doubt feature the duo in a face-off of unrequited love.

Jacqueline’s story is the weakest in this episode by far. Tina Fey, who wrote this episode, wasted no time getting her off the reservation. Jane Krakowski’s acting fails to impress when her character is taken out of the position of power, and her scenes, for the most part, fall flat in this episode (barring “Aloha”). Hopefully Jacqueline will be back in action as her old self in the coming episodes.

All in all, this by far wasn’t the best episode of “Kimmy Schmidt,” but the season still holds a lot of promise. The Kardashian jokes in this episode, the Fred Armisen cameo and Titus’ new multiple personalities landed effortlessly, and I have high hopes that this season only will continue to get better from here.