Advertisement
The Student News Site of DePaul University

The DePaulia

The Student News Site of DePaul University

The DePaulia

The Student News Site of DePaul University

The DePaulia

“The Boy and the Heron” review: A boy and a bird graciously sing Miyazaki’s swan song to cinema

%E2%80%9CThe+Boy+and+the+Heron%E2%80%9D+review%3A+A+boy+and+a+bird+graciously+sing+Miyazaki%E2%80%99s+swan+song+to+cinema

Moving through themes of faith, mortality and creation, Hayao Miyazaki’s “The Boy and the Heron” offers a radiant study of life through the eyes of pure adolescents, a hallmark of his work told in an enriching new way. Presumed to be his last cinematic bout, the film is denser than his past works, as the filmmaker pours his concessions with age and integrity into a story of semi-autobiographical design. Music by longtime collaborator Joe Hisaishi and a fantasy world of Miyazaki’s choosing blend into a melody of animated storytelling riddled by avian delight, an overt trick Miyazaki uses to connect the grace of nature with the presence of mankind. His potential last project is one of joy and association as he fuses his interests in art and fantasy with an unbridled love for the wonders of existence, for the beauty of life and more than ever, for the enduring power of a good story. 

*This film screened at the 59th Chicago International Film Festival

More to Discover